Disco band – Boogie Fever Disco Band http://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:59:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Disco band – Boogie Fever Disco Band http://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/ 32 32 How a Beijing Band’s Album Creation Process Took an Unusual Road https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/how-a-beijing-bands-album-creation-process-took-an-unusual-road/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 08:08:54 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/how-a-beijing-bands-album-creation-process-took-an-unusual-road/ Cricket fans will know all about the T-20 World Cup which recently took place in Australia. It’s a faster, more dramatic and exciting version of the sport’s regular format. Purists would say it’s a watered down version in the more historical, thoughtful and traditional ways of a five-day test match and, much like a greatest […]]]>

Cricket fans will know all about the T-20 World Cup which recently took place in Australia. It’s a faster, more dramatic and exciting version of the sport’s regular format. Purists would say it’s a watered down version in the more historical, thoughtful and traditional ways of a five-day test match and, much like a greatest hits album, it lacks storytelling and substance.

Granted, our conversation with British musician Dan Taylor doesn’t mention cricket, but his approach to music sounds like that of a cricket tester. He has patience, consistency, and a willingness to be confined with his group for long periods of time.

Taylor arrived in Beijing in 2013. He has become a mainstay in the city’s music scene having trained and acted as a singer-songwriter for The Harridans and more recently Phuture Vulture & the Absolute, the latter being in recording their debut album Good Grief. A charismatic character, to say the least, but Taylor’s musical philosophy doesn’t match his eccentric personality.

Taylor enjoying one of Beijing’s many winters while in China. Photo via Joanna Ma

“I’m a little reserved and a little shy when it comes to music,” Taylor said. This is. “Being a great player is not important to me. I think technicality is something people get a bit distracted from in music sometimes when the song should always come first.

The Harridans released their debut album Fuzzing the Muse in 2016. The record is a mix of shamelessly layered sounds mixed with Taylor’s spooky folk-inspired vocals. It incorporates disco and prog with a catchy sensibility and hasn’t been matched at this local level since. However, that was six years ago and while praise for past efforts is appreciated by the Yorkshireman, his conversation would instead focus on all things present.

“I remember playing the first Harridans album to my family. My mom said, ‘Oh yeah, that’s sweet, but can you do something nice and a little romantic.’ I said to myself: ‘Yeah, I can’,” the 34-year-old explains enthusiastically. “I want to embrace the idea of ​​romance and do something lavish and not just some kind of throwaway.

“Harridans’ first album was a bit like throwing all the ingredients into a pot. For example, we would have a 14 second recorder solo followed by a metallic drum breakdown. I want this new album to have a theme, be concise and have its own character so that it’s a cohesive project. I also want it to be beautiful and melodic.

If The Harridans aimed to get the crowd back on their feet, then Phuture Vulture & the Absolute aim to bring them back down. The slow, string-inspired songs carve out images of grief and regret, but ultimately hopefully when performed in an intimate live setting, they create a mellow atmosphere that Taylor is trying to replicate for the next album.

“I feel like I’m more passionate about what I want the final project to be. I feel that very strongly. I feel like it’s not just something to throw away or something to play with. When i listen i sometimes think it’s the biggest pile of garbage i’ve ever heard in my life sometimes i listen to it and i think it’s good but i never think it’s “is great. It took a long time. I think partly because life gets in my way, but also because I really want it to be good.”

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Taylor and his bandmates at his home in Beijing. Image via 大宇Sam

For those who know him best, Taylor is laid back and has a silly side that doesn’t take much to come out. He cracks wisely on stage while adopting a comic demeanor in an authentic way. On the other hand, his lyrics from the new album explore a mix of themes ranging from personal experiences to tall tales inspired by unusual sources. It is this combination of madness and fascination that gives his compositions a distinctive edge.

“’The Wise, the Kind and the Eternal’ is the first song we recorded for the album. The title comes from a phrase my ex-girlfriend’s father, a painter, coined about art. We used these three principles of ‘The Wise, the Kind and the Eternal’ as a kind of dogma for the album. These are beautiful and great principles for creating something. The Sage: to inform. The Gentile: to express love. The Eternal: invoke timelessness. Of course, we had to balance all that grandiosity with dirty puns and songs about spilling cream on your blouse.

Good Grief is a listening experience that acts as an exploration of art and identity that is not only expressed through its songs but also its process. It took nearly two years to complete, and Taylor spent a lot of time with Eric Ji, who is the album’s producer. Ji’s home is located on the outskirts of Beijing and for much of 2021-22 the longtime friends lived together and recorded there. The rest of the group occasionally makes the trip to the suburbs of the capital, but most of the time, there are only two. Think of Brad Pitt and Edward Norton in Fight Club.

“It’s not a studio where I pay by the hour. We can sit, we can talk, we can try different things and we can experiment. We have time to try different arrangements and different ideas. It definitely helped the album sound more interesting.

Having such a close ally to collaborate with removed the drastic pressures that come with time in the studio. It also means that Taylor can take a liberties or two, as Ji himself explains.

“Taylor and I have spent a lot of time together over the past two years. He slept in my bed almost as much as my girlfriend. The plan was to record the album quickly, from the acoustic demos he gave me. has data. Of course, once he starts adding one thing, he wants to add everything. It was about 10% recording and 90% sitting around discussing how best to use the microphone of an egg shaker.”

Most recently, the group spent two National Day days filming a live performance of the album at Ji’s house, one song in a room at a time. It was 48 hours of elaborate costumes and liquid courage culminating in a very unique show. Percussionist Jake Nimer sums up the recording, which should perhaps be called “Top of the Alcopops”.

“It was two days spent in the bottom of a bottle with Taylor dressed in fur barking instructions at us. English renaissance at its best. We were doing our best not to freeze to death in a room that was ridiculously cold for the period. of the year. We persevered to get something half decent!

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Harridans look natural in a photo shoot. Photo via 大宇Sam

Although Taylor is the main songwriter for Phuture Vulture & the Absolute, he was lucky enough to find the right people to bring into the band after laying the groundwork for this ambitious project. Along with fellow Brit Nimer, he’s joined by Finnish guitarist Jukka Ahonen, who has been the subject of a This is article in the August 2022 issue of the print magazine. Those who read him will know what a sought-after player he is. American brothers Shawn and Stanley Moore are on violins and cellos with their compatriot David Bond on keyboards and Iranian clarinettist Hadi Marvian.

READ MORE: For Love Not Money: The Best Guitarist You’ve Never Heard Of

The secret to Good Grief’s success will hinge on Taylor’s “sky’s the limit” attitude. There’s a nice structural simplicity to the tracks that can be played with just the man himself and an acoustic guitar. But what it does do is accompany the folk riffs with uplifting touches to give it an overall epic feel.

“I was listening to this interview with Brian Eno (Roxy Music keyboard player and U2 producer), and he was talking about one of his early albums. He realized that there was a lot of “I” in the lyrics, so he changed “I” to “we”. I tried it with this album, and it gives it this kind of almost bigoted behavior. Instead of saying “I love you” and “I miss you”, it was replaced by “we love you” and “we miss you”. Then I realized that if I was singing “we” I needed to have group vocals, so I asked a lot of people to do backing vocals. So we had strings and we had band vocals and that exploded in this project which is a bit over the top.

Good Grief is set for release in mid-December 2022, ending a two-year recording process, which would rival even the most particular artists. However, it’s not the destination that matters, it’s the journey that matters, and given Taylor’s tendency to get carried away by the music, the adventures of Phuture Vulture & the Absolute have only just begun.

[Cover image: Phuture Vultures & the Abolsute performing in Beijing photo via 海淀阑尾]

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Les Dorons: the YU family group https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/les-dorons-the-yu-family-group/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 18:21:31 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/les-dorons-the-yu-family-group/ If you asked people to think of musical groups from Yeshiva University, most would probably find Y-Studs A Cappella, The Maccabeats, and maybe even StandFour. But YU has produced another band – his very first rock band, in fact – as recently as the past few years, in the form of a family band called […]]]>

If you asked people to think of musical groups from Yeshiva University, most would probably find Y-Studs A Cappella, The Maccabeats, and maybe even StandFour. But YU has produced another band – his very first rock band, in fact – as recently as the past few years, in the form of a family band called the Dorons. This four-piece rock band is made up of two brothers – Yosef (vocals, guitar) and Aryeh Rosenfield (vocals, electric bass) – and their parents, Norman Rosenfield (guitar, keyboards) and Janice Kaidan (vocals, drums) .

The group’s founder, Aryeh, was a student at Yeshiva University between 2013 and 2017. He wasted no time choosing to major in music, declaring in just his second semester at Yeshiva College. “I thought I would major in history when I got to YU,” Aryeh recalls, but “taking a history class and a music class in the first semester” changed my mind. He even hosted a music radio show between 2013 and 2015 on YU’s student radio station, WYUR, where he had the opportunity to share his extensive musical knowledge and eclectic tastes. Aryeh also founded and played bass in the first-ever YU Rock Ensemble in 2014, which enjoyed a respectable nine-semester run. Although a rocker at heart, he also played bass for the YU Jazz Ensemble in his senior year.

The Dorons unofficially reunited as a group on May 14, 2017. Aryeh was about to graduate from YU at the time and had to give a senior recital in order to complete the music major, so he decided to recruiting his family of musicians—not formally a band at the time—to play with him for the occasion. Mom and Dad (Janice and Norman) had retired as performing musicians, previously veterans of Boston’s alternative rock scene of the 80s and 90s. Younger brother Yosef had only been playing guitar for three years. Nonetheless, the band transported their musical instruments and gear from their home in Providence, RI to the Schottenstein Theater at 560 West 185th St. and played an intimidating themed set from multiple albums spanning iconic Clash releases, the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix. “It took a lot of nerve to reproduce these artists”, ironically Norman.

When Aryeh finally graduated in May 2017 and his younger brother, Yosef, began his college career at Yeshiva University later that year, it seemed to Yosef that he was picking up where Aryeh had left off. stopped. “It was like the passing of a baton,” Yosef recalled, with Aryeh handing him the YU Rock Ensemble as Yosef became the ensemble’s new rhythm guitarist and lead vocalist. Yosef performed three concerts with the YU Rock Ensemble, after which in 2019 he became the only remaining member of the group. Rather than rebuild the set from virtually nothing (which he had just done the previous year), Yosef opted to continue performing, but solo.

Yosef’s first solo YU performance was a Maroon 5 and Panic! At The Disco tribute concert, where he browsed artists’ discographies and played a song from each album. At his next gig, Yosef played his own songs — mostly originals, with a few parodies mixed into the setlist. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit New York State just two months later, forcing Yosef to play his last three YU concerts from home via Zoom. This included his Senior Recital 2020for which Yosef followed in the footsteps of his brother Aryeh and asked his family group – who by then named themselves the Dorons – to support him for the performance.

Instead of playing a full set of covers, however, Yosef came up with the idea of ​​performing almost exclusively originals – including many songs that his mother, Janice, had written and/or released 30 to 40 years earlier when ‘she was in various bands with her. husband, Norman. It was that senior recital that prompted the Dorons to take a bunch of those songs they had already rehearsed, record them professionally in a studio, and finally launch an album project — something Aryeh was pushing the band. to do for quite a while. “It felt like a waste after all that preparation not to do more as a band,” Norman says.

Realizing they had writing sessions to do, the Dorons got to work. Three new songs ended up making the final cut of the album: a scathing pop-rock song written by Yosef called “Spare Me”, a mournful ballad written by Aryeh called “Chimes of Innocence” (which Aryeh started writing when he was an undergraduate YU) and passionate hard rocker co-written by Janice and Yosef called “This new poison.” Finally, after spending almost two years working on new music, the Dorons have finally finished their first album – titled “The Doronic Verses” – which was just released on November 11.

Wondering where the name “Dorons” comes from? Well, the band’s evocative name is fascinating. It references rock band The Doors as well as the bittersweet minor scale, the Dorian mode, and it hilariously rhymes with “morons.” Additionally, the word “dor” in Hebrew means “generation”, which speaks to the multi-generational nature of the group.

Then the Dorons will record and play more, if Norman has a say. “I know I won’t have to twist my arms too hard to do summer performances and get back into the studio,” he says with a good-natured laugh. Yosef, for his part, won’t need too much convincing. “The studio was the most meaningful part of the experience for me. We were all in sync, and that element of community flow was just euphoric,” Yosef marvels. “I’m excited to do more!”

For more stories like this, join us on whatsapp.

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Photo caption: Les Dorons

Photo credit: Yosef Rosenfield

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Murley Silver Band celebrates its anniversary with an event in Fivemiletown https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/murley-silver-band-celebrates-its-anniversary-with-an-event-in-fivemiletown/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 07:17:48 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/murley-silver-band-celebrates-its-anniversary-with-an-event-in-fivemiletown/ Friends and family of Murley Silver Band gathered to celebrate the band’s 98th anniversary with a Black Tie Dinner Dance at the Valley Hotel, Fivemiletown on Friday 4th November. Usually a bi-annual event, this was the Murley Silver Band’s first Black Tie dinner since 2018, due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The event was hosted by […]]]>

Friends and family of Murley Silver Band gathered to celebrate the band’s 98th anniversary with a Black Tie Dinner Dance at the Valley Hotel, Fivemiletown on Friday 4th November.

Usually a bi-annual event, this was the Murley Silver Band’s first Black Tie dinner since 2018, due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The event was hosted by group vice-chairman Mike Tarrant and his wife Rose, who recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary.

Describing the evening as “very special”, Stephen Bloomfield, who serves as co-chairman of the Murley Silver Band with his brother Mark Bloomfield, noted that there were around 140 people in attendance.

After the dinner main course, the band played a half-hour set, entertaining all in attendance by playing six pieces of music.

Gordon Campbell, trombrone teacher, was the special guest of the evening.

“Gordon is probably one of the best trombone players in the whole of the UK,” said Stephen, noting that at the event Gordon accompanied the Murley Silver Band in their performance before delivering their speech.

“He talked about his life experiences since he started [playing the trombone] as a child how he became a teacher on this instrument,” added Stephen.

Amid the celebrations, the band took the opportunity to remember two band members who sadly passed away earlier this year, William Lyons, who had been president of the Murley Silver Band and Herbie Robertson.

“Our President William Lyons sadly passed away on August 13. I paid tribute to his wife Geraldine, pretty much what William meant to us as a group. Not only was he our President, but he had given over 60 years of service to the band, as well as tutoring young musicians and helping people fix instruments. He was just an amazing man,” Stephen said, adding, “Then there was lifelong member Herbie Robertson who died Sept. 8.

“They were two people we especially wanted to remember on this occasion and the band played at both funerals.

“It was a very dark and emotional event for all associated with the group, considering that these gentlemen had been of service all their lives,” he said.

In the evening, on behalf of the group, Stephen thanked everyone present; friends, family and members of the local community for their support, commenting that it is because of them that Murley Silver Band exists, “to entertain the public and the communities” it serves. He also thanked The Valley Hotel for their support over the years.

The evening ended with a disco.

Speaking about the success of the event, Stephen said: “It was an event where friends and family of Murley Silver Band could all come together again, as the Covid times were so difficult.

“The most important thing was to mark the 98th anniversary and reflect on what Covid has meant to us as an organization because a lot of people who don’t play brass wouldn’t realize it had been over a year that we were stopped playing together in any format,” he said.

“We’re going to do the same for the band’s 100th anniversary in two years and that’s why we wanted to do this event, to bring people out again and remind them of what the band is trying to achieve, which is to to say entertain in our local communities and highlight the importance of music to people and their well-being,” Stephen told the newspaper.

Over the next few weeks the Murley Silver Band will take part in a series of concerts, work with the Fermanagh Choral Society and hold events in their own local community.

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The best indie sleaze gifts, from band merch to disco pants https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/the-best-indie-sleaze-gifts-from-band-merch-to-disco-pants/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 20:15:16 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/the-best-indie-sleaze-gifts-from-band-merch-to-disco-pants/ Of all the nostalgic trends that resurfaced last year, perhaps the most unexpected was the return of indie sleaze. Capturing this brief cultural and stylistic period between the turn of the millennium and the late 2000s, the indie sleaze gestures towards a specific subset of the “naughty:” think of this period after MySpace and just […]]]>

Of all the nostalgic trends that resurfaced last year, perhaps the most unexpected was the return of indie sleaze. Capturing this brief cultural and stylistic period between the turn of the millennium and the late 2000s, the indie sleaze gestures towards a specific subset of the “naughty:” think of this period after MySpace and just before Tumblr: eye- pickled liner, flash photography, scarves and skinny jeans, all things American Apparel and the slew of party photos documented on The Cobrasnake. In the grand scheme of things, indie sleaze might have been just a blip, and yet the the intrigue and nostalgia of this era has never been higher.

For many people, indie sleaze is also the rebirth of indie rock in New York during the 2000s, led by The Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Interpol, LCD Soundsystem, and more – yet another arena where grime, grunge, and intentional mayhem reigned supreme. Below, we’ve rounded up the best indie sleaze-core gifts to give away this holiday season – from rare band merch to disco pants to the holy grail of indie sleaze makeup – so whether you’re attacking the indie sleaze of fashion, beauty, or musical perspective, this list has you covered.

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Dancing into Creativity: How a Local Band Was Inspired by Philadelphia Sports https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/dancing-into-creativity-how-a-local-band-was-inspired-by-philadelphia-sports/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 22:05:16 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/dancing-into-creativity-how-a-local-band-was-inspired-by-philadelphia-sports/ LongFriend TimeFriend, featuring Rowan alum, Pete Imbesi, has released their punk cover of the Phillies’ chosen 2022 winning song. – Animation/Em McMahon & Pete Imbesi The past two weeks have been an incredibly exciting and emotional time if you’ve been following Philadelphia sports. As the Phillies won the NLCS and moved on to compete in […]]]>
LongFriend TimeFriend, featuring Rowan alum, Pete Imbesi, has released their punk cover of the Phillies’ chosen 2022 winning song. – Animation/Em McMahon & Pete Imbesi

The past two weeks have been an incredibly exciting and emotional time if you’ve been following Philadelphia sports. As the Phillies won the NLCS and moved on to compete in the World Series, fans were constantly caught shouting Calum Scott’s cover of Robyn’s song, “Dancing On My Own,” as a hymn to the citywide to celebrate the team’s success this season. .

Calum Scott wasn’t the only artist to cover Robyn’s original popular song, however. Local Philadelphia band LongFriend TimeFriend with drummer Pete Imbesi, a Rowan University alumnus, created a unique “punk rock cover” of the song. The song was released on October 21 and comes with an animated video on Youtube.

The group is made up of four musicians, who also happen to be two groups of lifelong friends.

“Our guitarist and vocalist Em, they and I have been playing music together since we were twelve or thirteen,” Imbesi said. “We met our freshman in high school and played in a ska-punk band called the Political Party Crashers for about ten years together.”

It was only after the band split up that they were able to forge a new musical collaboration.

“The band broke up a few years ago when we were shortly out of college,” Imbesi said. “We [Imbesi and Em] remained good friends and we both worked on music independently and kind of showed each other our stuff, but we always had the idea that we wanted to start another band.

The band is local to the city and due to the team’s success and the growing popularity of the song, a unique opportunity arose to do a cover. Especially since the sports of Philadelphia have already inspired the group.

“We were doing something where people could pay us to do covers,” Imbesi said. “One of the people who supported us wanted us to do a Philadelphia 76ers cover…their victory song. They have a song called ‘Here Comes the Sixers’ and it’s like an old song disco… It was really well done and it’s something we always love to play live whenever it’s basketball season and we don’t think we’re going to jinx the team.”

The band’s experience and the popularity surrounding the song provided a perfect opportunity to create their own version of the beloved song.

“When the Phillies entered the World Series…they picked ‘Dancing On My Own’ as their victory anthem. We were like ‘it’s amazing, it’s this iconic queer power pop song that’s chosen by this Philadelphia sports team that had nothing to do so far,'” he said. “It just felt like a really great time, kind of a perfect time.”

Although the Phillies lost the series, fans will always have the song as a musical reminder of the magic of the City of Brotherly Love in the weeks leading up to the games. The song was a symbol of how devoted fans were to their team and their hometown. The cover only illustrates how inspiring the song was to Philadelphians.

The band’s cover is a reminder of the fans’ love and dedication to their music and their team, especially given the circumstances in which the song was written. The band created the song in just a few days – wanting to release it for fans before the series ended.

“The context in which it was done is, I think, the most interesting part. We had decided we were going to do it, but we decided we were going to do it the week before my wedding,” Imbesi said. “I got married on October 22 and we started working on it on Monday of this week.”

The timeline of the games and these life events only left the band a few days to create the song, the animation, and release it.

“It was part of the mentality, we only have this week to do it…we wanted to get it out before the show,” Imbesi said. “So it was kind of like, ‘Okay, let’s try! Let’s do our best and see what we do and hope it comes to fruition” and luckily it does. »

The song can be heard on Youtube, and their other music, including their album “If Me Dies, Me Dies”, and their split EP with New York band Marinara, “Eagles Court”, can be found on most streaming platforms, like Spotify and Bandcamp .

The band is grateful for the support from Philadelphia fans and encourages people who liked the cover to check out their other music as well.

For questions/comments on this story, email the.whit.arts@gmail.com or tweet @TheWhitOnline.

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Ibibio Sound Machine are the coolest band ever, and they know it https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/ibibio-sound-machine-are-the-coolest-band-ever-and-they-know-it/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 05:43:26 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/ibibio-sound-machine-are-the-coolest-band-ever-and-they-know-it/ Eno Williams dances around the stage, his sleeves swirling as his arms reach with steely determination towards the disco ball on the ceiling, his feet marching to the demanding beat. A member of the public waves him closer and gives him a gift in the form of a Philadelphia Phillies jersey. She puts it around […]]]>

Eno Williams dances around the stage, his sleeves swirling as his arms reach with steely determination towards the disco ball on the ceiling, his feet marching to the demanding beat. A member of the public waves him closer and gives him a gift in the form of a Philadelphia Phillies jersey. She puts it around her shoulders, signaling the love she expressed for her Philadelphia audience all night long. The party on stage is almost rivaled by the absolute riot of a moment people have in the crowd. “I’m going to show it to my mother!” she proclaims. Williams locks the eyes of people in the World Cafe Live audience and dedicates a song to the city of Philadelphia, one step from Ibibio sound machine‘s (ISM) Electricity Live Tour on October 20.

ISM are a British Afro-funk band based in London consisting vocalist and frontwoman Eno Williams, guitarist Alfred Kari Bannerman, percussionist Anselmo Netto, drummer Jose Joyette, bassist Derrick McIntyre, Tony Hayden on trombone and synth, Scott Baylis on trumpet and synth and Max Grunhard saxophone and synth. The Byte released their critically acclaimed fourth studio album, Electricity, in March 2022.

Williams arrives on stage in a gold headpiece, bright red patterned dress and matching boots, complete with a red fur coat. His presence demands the audience’s attention, but not in an intimidating way.

Williams points to her heart to introduce the first song and says, “Without love, there’s no electricity. The synthesizer picks up immediately and begins the title track. “Let me speak from the heart, without love / There’s no, no, no electricity.” His voice is monotonous and you can feel the thundering rhythm under your feet. Unlike a number of songs on their discography, the lyrics are in English.

Often, “the lyrics are based on the Ibibio language of southeastern Nigeria and stories I was told growing up in Africa,” Williams said. Told The Arts Office. Williams sings folk tales she heard growing up and also sings to protect her audience. “protection from evilwas a song written during the COVID-19 lockdowns. Williams describes this time as “the most chaotic time”, and this song serves as a “prayer song”. The hypnotic synth kicks in and it feels like the 80s become cool again.

I need you to be sweet like sugar (Nnge Nte Suka)” is a funkier track from the ISM album Doko Mine. The versatility of their hour-and-a-half-long set introduced audiences to their dynamic sound and showcased Williams’ incredible vocal range. She invites the sparse audience to dance and sing with her in “The Song (Iquo Isang).” To my surprise, the crowd consists largely of white people in their 30s and 40s, who enthusiastically sing along to Ibibio’s lyrics.

Williams talks about Ibibio and its cultivation in southern Nigeria. She talks about the kidnappings of 276 Chibok schoolgirls by Boko Haram in 2014, and laments that “it could have been me”. She sings “Give me a reasonwhich doesn’t slow the pace, but still conveys Williams’ grief over the situation. In an interview with Weekly entertainmentwilliams exclaimed, “Why can’t we just be free to be whoever we want to be?” Why can’t children just be free? It’s not an angry song. It’s a challenge. This is [about] empower people. »

The band’s energy is contagious and they are clearly having fun on stage. At one point during the concert, Williams points and dances towards Netto. She then throws water on Joyette during her drum solo. Many bands are absorbed in technical details during their performances and do not interact with their audience members or band members. Sure, ISM goes above and beyond, but it’s the standard that all other live artists should be competing against. You can’t help but feel loved by Williams. In fact, she tells the audience “I love you” in a heartfelt way that makes everyone stop and smile, before continuing to dance.

During Grunhard’s saxophone solo, Williams calls it “absolutely wonderful”. She owns the scene, but shares it with her group members in a democratic way. The group then encourages the public to take part in the celebration. Williams tells us to clap our hands, tap our feet and motions us to go left then right. She then utters words of encouragement like a kindergarten teacher: “You got it!”

At the end of the concert, Williams leaves the audience with words of affirmation, saying, “Anything you want in life, you can have.” But this is not the end. Before-again, Netto comes back and says, “Every time I go on stage, nothing else matters. I have fun. Then asks the audience, “Are you going to dance like there’s no tomorrow?” at which the crowd goes absolutely wild.

As a reminder, Williams returns to the stage with the Phillies jersey. As the instrumentals continue, Williams takes the time to introduce her band members one by one, showing the utmost appreciation to the people she creates with. Williams shines in the spotlight, but clarifies that this is a group of equal members who all contribute to the success of ISM.

The concert showcased the infectious styles of Afrobeats, exposing a predominantly white audience to Nigerian cultural sounds, seemingly breaking through cultural barriers. But more importantly, ISM highlighted the love they have for each other and for their audience. After the show, Williams stood behind the merchandise line, signing vinyl and taking photos. Although they have the star factor to rise to the top of the electronic dance music genre, ISM’s personal intimacy with audiences sets them apart from any other band, providing an invaluable concert experience.

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Scottish folk-fusion band’s Elephant Sessions reach their musical destiny https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/scottish-folk-fusion-bands-elephant-sessions-reach-their-musical-destiny/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 15:15:08 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/scottish-folk-fusion-bands-elephant-sessions-reach-their-musical-destiny/ A Elephant sessions The gig is always a lively night, but Alasdair Taylor admits their last one, at Glasgow’s famous Barrowlands Ballroom, was something else entirely. The band celebrated their 10th anniversary with their biggest production to date, including a light show and backing from a live string quartet. “There were so many things that […]]]>

A Elephant sessions The gig is always a lively night, but Alasdair Taylor admits their last one, at Glasgow’s famous Barrowlands Ballroom, was something else entirely. The band celebrated their 10th anniversary with their biggest production to date, including a light show and backing from a live string quartet. “There were so many things that could have gone wrong, it was kind of scary,” laughs Taylor. “Every time I turned around to look at one of the boys, I saw a wall of screens and lasers and thought, ‘This is crazy! “”

Two weeks later, the group is “just coming down” from the experience. “It’s our new benchmark,” says Taylor. Because after a decade together, the Scottish folk-fusion band have finally achieved the sound – and experience – they were always destined for. You can hear it on their fourth studio album, For the nightwhose tracks bring together the tradition of Highland tunes they grew up with, and the rich mix of electronic, dance and funk they never tire of.

Taylor lives in Inverness in the heart of Scotland; his window overlooks the hills surrounding the small town, and he can even make out Ben Wyvis, the largest munro (or mountain) in the region. Fiddler Euan Smillie, who has been making music with Taylor since they were teenagers, lives a short distance away in a rural hamlet. “It’s a country that feels remote, even when you’re only 20 minutes from town,” Taylor says. Loch Ness, Scotland’s second largest freshwater lake, is only five miles away.

It’s a very different place to Glasgow, the gritty and grungy birthplace of Scotland’s vibrant music scene, but it’s pretty great for inspiration. “We live in a very beautiful part of the world,” sighs Taylor. The new album’s fourth song, “Taransay”, is named after a boat they took out on the loch for Euan’s birthday and its trance-like mood suggests everyone had a sweet time.

Fusing Scottish fiddle tunes with electronics isn’t new, but its growing popularity is. One of the band’s inspirations is Martyn Bennett, revered for his impact on modern Scottish music and “the first innovator to blend proper dance music with Gaelic pipework and culture” according to Taylor. Then there was Shooglenifty, whose ’90s fusions inspired him to take up mandolin, and Croft No. 5, blending Highland music with African rhythms. The latter’s track, “Elephant”, is the origin of the name of Taylor and Smillie’s band.

These days, Elephant Sessions are riding a wave of late-night enthusiasm as their own brand of folk-fusion perform to large, raucous crowds both in their own country and as far afield as Eastern Europe. and Australia. “And there’s a bunch of younger bands following us who are realizing that you can branch out and do something totally different than anybody has done before,” Taylor says. “The scene has really grown, and that will only increase the longevity of folk music.”

When Taylor was learning the violin in school, folk music was considered deeply uncool. “Children can be cruel to each other. You were laughed at and it caused so many people to give up. Now I tell all these people, “You’d make so much money with piping for weddings and funerals if you stuck to that!”

At 12, Taylor’s father gave him an MP3 player featuring some of his favorite artists – Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, Toto, AC/DC – and the young boy swapped the violin for the guitar. Soon he and Smillie were making big money playing traditional fiddle and guitar gigs in local bars and hotels – but they knew that wasn’t the musical life they wanted. “We wanted bass and synth and drum kits and samples and big stages and things like that,” Taylor explains. “We just had to figure out how to get there.”

They met Greg Barry, who played drums in function bands, in a fèis, a youth program teaching Gaelic arts. They would get together and jam in the cabana at the end of his backyard (Taylor reckons he’s spent “weeks, even months” of his life there) and it was the perfect place to start experimenting with new sounds. Seth Tinsley, the band’s bassist, met Taylor during Newcastle University’s folk course, and Elephant Sessions was born – merging Barry and Tinsley’s love of funk with Smillie’s passion for electronics with a common folk experience.

Their first album in 2014 – The elusive beauty of the Highlands – has remained traditional and largely acoustic. “There were two tracks with electric guitar distortion and one with a bit of synth,” Taylor recalls, “and we were afraid to do the same. There were gigs where we looked at the crowd and said, ‘ We can’t play that one tonight, look where we are! It took gaining confidence and learning a lot about different genres to be comfortable enough to do this current mix.

Before working on an album, they create a common playlist where each member adds their favorite inspirations of the moment. “We send each other listening assignments all the time, we listen to so much music before we even start writing,” says Taylor. This year’s playlist included Dua Lipa’s “Don’t Start Now” for its phenomenal bass line. “We kept playing it on loop, trying to capture that disco funk vibe, and that’s how we ended up with our track ‘After Hours’.”

The groove was laid long before the track. “In folk music, people usually come with a melody and the rest of you go along with it, and that’s what we’ve always done,” Taylor says. Then Covid hit, and the way they interacted had to change. “On the first album, I wrote half of the tracks and Euan wrote the other half. Now we write the whole album together. We can start with a bass riff, a drum beat, a vibe on a hip hop track… it’s a much longer process but it’s more rewarding. And you can hear us enjoying it more!”

The vibe of their new record is captured in its title: For the night is an ecstatic tribute to everything they had lost during the pandemic, “everything we did and missed”. This included live music, parties at festivals, and messy parties that ended at their local dive bar, Johnny Foxes, where they drank mixed shots of tequila and absinthe that the bartender dubbed “Misty Badger” ( they once dedicated a song to the drink).

After the “despair of being stuck inside”, the music they made after Covid was the most upbeat. “At the start of the lockdown, we were all bereft of creativity, but somehow that desire to reclaim that freedom and that joy is in this album more than any other we’ve done. The lockdown has ended up being a big inspiration, something I wouldn’t have imagined a year ago.”

The album also benefited from the contribution of Duncan Lyall, one of the leading bassists and producers of the Scottish folk scene. It was the band’s first time using a producer from outside their own creative bubble, and the results were instantaneous. Under Lyall’s guidance, writing sessions took on a new direction and creative blockages disappeared. Originally, “Taransay” had a breakbeat backing which dampened its momentum; Lyall introduced the call and response section in the middle which helps the music flow and build.

The band also credit him with saving their last track, “FM,” which was even longer than its final seven-minute runtime before he helped make it more succinct. It’s now such a powerful track – with a haunting guitar solo – that they end their sets with it. Curiously, its title does not actually refer to the radio sample that introduces the piece, but to the fact that it is written in F sharp minor, which makes it particularly difficult for mandolin and violin players to play. “But the B part is this classic style melody and it only sings in that key,” Taylor explains.

You can hear how confident the band has gained in their driving basslines and unabashed beats. For Taylor, the turning point came in 2018, when they were surprised to find they had sold their gig to Celtic Connections (“we were super, super nervous,” Taylor says, “the Old Fruit Market was a place that seemed way too big for us”). Major festival breakthroughs followed in the Czech Republic and Australia. “I think the fact that we were from Scotland intrigued people, and those three shows made us realizing that we could shoot a production, and that kind of music can be suitable for a wide audience, not even the one who knows us.

With For the night, they push the boundaries they’ve always wanted. “We definitely couldn’t have made this album 10 years ago,” Taylor says. “Everyone has improved as writers, as arrangers, performers.” The results even surprised them. “We always knew Elephant Sessions would merge these genres, but I don’t think we knew how far we would go.”


Photo credit: Euan Robertson

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A former SF band brings psych grooves to the chapel https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/a-former-sf-band-brings-psych-grooves-to-the-chapel/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 19:37:00 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/a-former-sf-band-brings-psych-grooves-to-the-chapel/ SAN FRANCISCO — Although initially launched as a side project for Wooden Shjips guitarist Ripley Johnson, the pulsating psych band Moon Duo has gradually grown to match the popularity of Johnson’s other band. Having first come to prominence as a member of the buzzing SF psy quartet that helped foster a local resurgence of mind-bending […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO — Although initially launched as a side project for Wooden Shjips guitarist Ripley Johnson, the pulsating psych band Moon Duo has gradually grown to match the popularity of Johnson’s other band. Having first come to prominence as a member of the buzzing SF psy quartet that helped foster a local resurgence of mind-bending sounds in the mid-2000s, Johnson founded Moon Duo with his wife, singer/keyboardist Sanae Yamada. , in 2009.

The duo explored a similarly minimalist sound – frequently using a drum machine as rhythmic backing – on their early EPs. kill time and Escape. However, the songs featured a driving beat and a fractured pop sensibility that echoed the proto-electronic experiments of Silver Apples and New York City synth punk duo Suicide. Moon Duo has since released a string of acclaimed full-length albums through the Sacred Bones Records imprint that have continued to hone Johnson and Yamada’s unique blend of dreamy atmospheres and propelling krautrock grooves.


Moon Duo – Mazes (official video) by
UndergroundTV on
Youtube

Both musicians left San Francisco long ago (first moving to Colorado before finally settling in Portland, Oregon), but have maintained a steady output of melodious, hypnotic efforts. While their 2015 recording The shadow of the sun received praise from online outlets like NPR and The Quietus for introducing an almost industrial grit to their synth sound, two years later the Tandem Collections Occult Architecture Vol. 1 and vol. 2 ventured into even darker, more gothic territory.


Moon Duo – Creepin’ (Official Audio) by
Disks of Sacred Bones on
Youtube

Moon Duo went on hiatus while Wooden Shjips returned to the stage in 2018 with a new studio album V and the lysergic live document shijps in the night which was recorded during a performance at the now-closed club San Francisco Slim’s that year, but the band returned the following year with the release of The stars are the light. Recorded at a studio in Portugal’s Serra de Sintra with Spacemen 3 and Spectrum director Sonic Boom behind the controls, the new album features elements of heart-pounding disco and ’90s electronic dance music for a brighter, more pop.


Moon Duo – Lost Heads (Official Audio) by
Disks of Sacred Bones on
Youtube

Last year, the band was one of many alumni of the Levitation Festival in Austin, Texas, featured on a live recording produced by festival-affiliated publisher, the Reverberation Appreciation Society. The Living in levitation The volume featuring Moon Duo includes recordings of the band’s performances in 2012 and 2014. Returning to the stage for the first time in over two years, the band recently visited Austin for this year’s edition of Levitation Fest and will travel to Mexico City for the Hipnosis Festival this weekend. Moon Duo performs its immersive and deeply psychedelic multimedia show “The Lightship” at San Francisco Chapel on Thursday as part of the club’s 10th anniversary concert series. Midnight Artist (aka Caleb Pate) spins an extended DJ set to kick off the proceedings.

Duo Moon
Thursday, Nov. 3, 7:30 p.m. $22 to $25
The Chapel

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Interview with Miami Band Donzii on their single “Grave” and their debut album https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/interview-with-miami-band-donzii-on-their-single-grave-and-their-debut-album/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 13:07:50 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/interview-with-miami-band-donzii-on-their-single-grave-and-their-debut-album/ Donzii is more than a band. Donzii is an experience, a convergence of energies and talents that form a rare creative universe: the universe of Donzii. Whether on a record player or on stage, the Miami-based band opens the door inside each of us that holds both our dark side and a deep need for […]]]>

Donzii is more than a band. Donzii is an experience, a convergence of energies and talents that form a rare creative universe: the universe of Donzii.

Whether on a record player or on stage, the Miami-based band opens the door inside each of us that holds both our dark side and a deep need for physical pleasure. Donzii offers audiences an emotional experience that mirrors our inner lives as we navigate crisis after crisis, but with dance, music, and serious sexual energy. His ability to tap into those feelings landed him on the indie label Gray Market Records and in prime spots at music festivals like III Points, Okeechobee Music & Arts Festival and South by Southwest.

Front-person, performance artist and activist Jenna Balfe uses clever, sometimes humorous lyrics, fabulous fashions and its genuine dynamism to attract crowds. Meanwhile, the band creates a captivating atmosphere, with Balfe’s husband Dennis Fuller on bass and drums, Danny Heinze on guitar, and Violet de la Guardia and Mauricio Abascal on keyboards and backing vocals.

Community is a big part of what makes Donzii more than a band. Friends are often crucial to the band’s performances and videos, sharing ideas and contributing choreography, dancing, sets, costumes and body painting.

“Having people that are part of the Donzii story, people that I care about or people that I meet through the experience of this project, the creation of this community, makes the music alive and palpable for me,” said said Balfe. “It becomes this real universe that I feel, see and interact with.”

The band’s music is a reflection of Miami’s surroundings – the glittering Magic City that is also a slowly sinking target of climate change fueled superstorms.

“Growing up here is this beautiful place, and there’s subtle, beautiful nature there,” adds Balfe, “but there’s something that can really pull you in, something magical, marshy and very grounded.”

Balfe remembers regularly running away from home when she was younger and being a part of this “dark mystery, these trees, the swamp, the air, the strange dilapidated buildings”. The more sinister side of the tropical city and the threats of climate change, she believes, “set us all in this aggressiveness by default”. And all this is represented in the songs of Donzii.

The dive is also deep for Fuller, a classically trained percussionist and film composer.
“I feel like our music is anti-development,” he says. “It is, in the most reactionary sense, about building and building and adding shit on top of shit.” And this is reflected in the decision to clash with classical musical structures. “Thematically and empirically, we’re more dissonant, and the music complements that anti-development feeling.” They use audio effects you might hear in Halloween music to invoke the feeling, “Why do I feel excited but unhinged at the same time?” Fuller said. “And that’s the kind of world we live in.”

But all is not serious. The music is “also infused with an element of joy. That’s kind of where my melodies fit into that structure. We love to play with that,” Balfe says. His words, tone and facial expressions highlight the comic irony of this time and this city. “Yes, there are a lot of tragedies and pains that I personally work as an activist to change, but there has to be a point for my own sanity that I laugh at.”

Donzii has just released their latest single, “Grave”. It’s Balfe’s favorite song from the band’s upcoming debut album, Fishbowl, which is slated for release on December 1. Fuller says the album, written and recorded in 2020 in San Francisco with Soft Kill bassist Shaun Durkan, has a more complex sound than previous releases. “A lot of the stuff we did was really stripped down, post-punk stuff, Fuller explains. “This one has synthesizers and some strings.”

balf says Fishbowl is “like a variety of musical styles. It’s like you go to the store and say, ‘I want one of all the genres you have at Spec’s’ or whatever. We felt really rebellious.” This mix of styles was done on purpose. “It frustrates me to feel like I have to be a brand,” she laments. “The frustration of ‘I have to be a marketable thing.’ The market economy algorithm. Having all these different genres and styles is like, “Don’t get me stuck!” Look at who I am entirely; look at this project as a whole; look at all these people. It’s not It’s not about selling this thing; it’s about living this thing and opening your mind beyond having a closet of 12 cohesive pieces by all the good designers. We’re bigger than that.”

Fuller agrees, “You go to a developed community, and every eff’ing house is the same. This album is like going through a million different neighborhoods.”

Haunted house party live stream. With Donzii, Mixx Piggy, Angelfire, Nicholas G. Padilla, Club Amnesia, Stranger Cat. 10 p.m. on Friday, October 28, via instagram.com/_donzii.

Donzii. With Glove, 10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29 at Gramps, 176 NW 24 St., Miami; gramps.com. Tickets cost between $15 and $18 via eventbrite.com.

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Panic! EP At The Disco Surprise release date: The band thanks fans for making this song go viral https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/panic-ep-at-the-disco-surprise-release-date-the-band-thanks-fans-for-making-this-song-go-viral/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 01:35:00 +0000 https://boogiefeverdiscoband.com/panic-ep-at-the-disco-surprise-release-date-the-band-thanks-fans-for-making-this-song-go-viral/ Panic! At The Disco has a special treat for its fans after their overwhelming support made one of their songs go viral on TikTok. Months after the release of their seventh studio album “Viva Las Vengeance”, the band are back with a brand new EP to surprise their fans. According iHeart, fans of the punk […]]]>

Panic! At The Disco has a special treat for its fans after their overwhelming support made one of their songs go viral on TikTok. Months after the release of their seventh studio album “Viva Las Vengeance”, the band are back with a brand new EP to surprise their fans.

According iHeart, fans of the punk rock band have allowed the song “House of Memories” to go viral on social media. The track was part of their album “Death of a Bachelor” originally released in 2016.

Taking to their official Twitter account, the group expressed their gratitude to their fans by releasing a three-track EP titled “House of Memories EP.”

“Y’all blew this up on TikTok so we’re throwing it back to the Death Of A Bachelor era and giving you the official slowed + sped up versions,” they wrote.

Comprised of three songs, the upcoming EP, which will be released on Friday, October 28, will contain the original track as well as slowed down and sped up versions of it.

The album cover features a garden with a swimming pool as Brendon Urie lays down on the roof.

READ ALSO: Chloe X Halle reunites with Beyoncé amidst successful solo careers [PHOTOS]

Panic! At The Disco Accident at the ‘Viva Las Vengeance’ concert

The recent news comes days after the band successfully completed the North American leg of their “Viva Las Vengeance” tour.

However, there was a accident last month when they performed at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minneapolis, when a fire appeared to have started in the corner of the stage.

Despite the alarming situation, frontman Brendon Urie continued to play as staff extinguished the flames with a fire extinguisher.

At the time of this writing, none of the tour’s production team or band members have confirmed the cause of the fire, but people who attended the show say it was caused by stage pyrotechnics. Fortunately, there were no reports of people injured from the incident.

Their North American tour dates feature special guests MARINA, Jake Wesley Rogers and Beach Bunny on select dates.

Along with FLETCHER, the band will return to tour next year for their European and UK tour dates. Their next show will be at the Stadthalle in Vienna, Austria on February 20, 2023.

They will also visit several cities like Munich, Hamburg, Cologne, Rotterdam, Paris, Glasgow, Birmingham and many more.

Panic! At The Disco’s final show is said to be at the AO Arena in Manchester, UK on March 10, 2023. Tickets are available on their official site.

READ MORE: How Stevie Wonder Revolutionized Music With An Iconic Album: 50 Years of “Talking Book”

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