How the British band braved drug addiction and bandmate feuds for decades-Entertainment News, Firstpost

Why The Rolling Stones have had the longevity they have enjoyed is because they are one of the greatest examples of what teamwork can really produce.

In #TheMusicThatMadeUs, veteran journalist Lakshmi Govindrajan Javeri shares the impact musicians and their art have on our lives, how they’re shaping the industry by rewriting its rules, and how they’re shaping us to become the people we become: their most great legacy.

*

Despite jokes about Keith Richards’ apparent immortality, what’s the secret to the Rolling Stones’ perpetual fame?

In 2022, the British band will complete 60 years of rocking our world. Six decades is no mean feat for any band; let alone one that has been riddled with tales of drunken brawls, substance and alcohol abuse, and feuds between bandmates. But in six decades, the Rolling Stones have managed to show musicians half their age what it takes to be that all-consuming stage presence.

Their No Filter tour, which was originally scheduled for 2020, was pushed back to last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic which crippled the live entertainment industry worldwide. The year 2021 has been no different, but it has given a boost to the live events scene, with vaccination and real-time PCR testing becoming the norm. Yet it wasn’t all song and dance, as bands began to perform cautiously in bubbles and tour less.

No filter tour was originally planned without considering their legendary drummer Charlie Watts, who was battling medical complications. In 2021, Watts passed away and the band took a few months to come to terms with the loss before ending the year on a high note. The Stones’ tour was the biggest grosser of 2021. The band grossed $115.5 million, selling 516,624 tickets in total for 12 shows in 11 cities. This, at a time when the notion of “classic rock is dead” is deeply ingrained in the mindset of millennials.

How to explain the genius of a group led by a man with extraordinary energy but with limited vocal cords? Their own peers have conflicting opinions of the band, with Paul McCartney recently saying they were unremarkable while The Who’s Roger Daltrey didn’t mince words when calling them a mediocre pub band. But mediocrity can’t get one that far.

Sixty years of the Rolling Stones How the British band braved drug addiction and bandmate feuds for decades

McCartney may have ridiculed them recently for being a blues cover band, but truth be told, the Rolling Stones rarely returned to their blues roots, preferring instead to scale new sonic frontiers while keeping their unique brand of rock at their core. One of the major bands along with the Beatles to lead the British invasion of America, the Rolling Stones stood out from their immaculately clean contemporaries with dodgy haircuts. Working the quintessential rock star vibe with unkempt hair and envious stage presence, the Rolling Stones were the perfect antithesis to the early ’60s that made music grittier, heavier and more suited to a hard rock sound.

Led by Mick Jagger, the band, in its most popular form, included multi-instrumentalist Brian Jones and then Ronnie Wood, guitarist Keith Richards, bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Watts. This group has recorded record sales estimated at 200 million, making them one of the best-selling musical artists of all time. After winning three Grammy Awards and a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, they were also inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989 and have, over the past decades, topped several lists of the greatest bands of all time. .

Sixty years of the Rolling Stones How the British band braved drug addiction and bandmate feuds for decades

From being essentially a blues cover band to riding ’60s stoner rock, embracing the heavier, fatter sound of the ’70s that straddled hard rock and disco at opposite ends, to cruising the sound New Wave that characterized the 80s, The The Rolling Stones redefined themselves during the first three or four decades of their career, before returning to their comfort zone of 60s and 70s rock that delves deep into the various sub- genres and the rich subcultures of rock and roll itself. In fact, their 2016 album blue and lonely brought them like close to their blues roots as they had been for decades.

If we were to be more objective, Jagger is a great leader who manages to lead the charge and inspire a crowd like few can, but he’s not the most talented man in the bunch.

Why The Rolling Stones have had the longevity they have enjoyed is because they are one of the greatest examples of what teamwork can really produce.

Unlike many frontman-driven ’60s rock bands that were often derailed by ego clashes between singer and guitarist, the Stones were incredibly tight-knit as a unit despite the Jagger-Richards feuds. And they’ve proven time and time again that creativity and business savvy don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Sure, Jagger is an alumnus of the London School of Economics, but it’s the band’s shrewd self-awareness and ability to translate their individual strengths into a bigger cause on stage that has helped them withstand the storm. test of time. After the shifting dynamic between Jagger and Richards, with a heady dose of heroin addiction thrown into the mix, age has calmed things down and eased the tension. The band’s openness to having many session musicians on studio recordings also gave their sound an evolving attitude despite their return to their rock identity.

Over their 60-year career, the band have gone on 48 different tours of varying lengths, making them one of the most commercially viable bands to perform live in front of stadium-sized audiences. What sets them apart is the incredible energy they bring to every show. They’re in their seventies but that doesn’t stop Jagger from jumping up and dashing across the stage. From the moment they take the stage until the curtain rolls, the Rolling Stones take their audience on a musical rollercoaster that covers their most energetic classics like ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction, ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash,’ ‘Sympathy for the Devil,’ and ‘Start Me Up’ among others to their most poignant like ‘Angie, ”Wild Horses,’ and ‘Drudge.’

Sixty years later, time is truly on their side.

Sixty years of the Rolling Stones How the British band braved drug addiction and bandmate feuds for decades

Senior journalist Lakshmi Govindrajan Javeri has spent the better part of two decades chronicling arts, culture and lifestyles.

Comments are closed.